Archive for the ‘Herbal Info’ Category

New Editions of Rosemary Gladstar’s Classic Books Are Here!

Posted by Christine|14 November 2014

Rosemary-books

 

These classic texts from the herbal community’s beloved Rosemary Gladstar are hot off the press. This collection of new 2014 editions have a wealth of herbal knowledge and how-to information with updated looks.

Herbs for Common Ailments

Previously sold under the title Herbs for the Home Medicine Chest, this informative guide profiles more than 50 herbs that are safe and effective for treating common ailments and injuries. Discover recipes for salves, teas, tinctures, and more, along with instructions for making an herbal first aid kit.

Herbs for Stress & Anxiety

This new edition was previously titled Herbs for Reducing Stress & Anxiety. Throughout this text, Rosemary Gladstar shows you simple herbal remedies that strengthen and build a healthy nervous system. She profiles 21 herbs proven to be effective at soothing common stress symptoms. Enjoy the herbs in tea decoctions and infusions, take them as capsules or tinctures, and relax in warm baths enhanced by their calming scents.

Herbs for Long-Lasting Health

Formerly known as Herbs for Longevity & Well-Being, this exciting guide outlines the rejuvenating and healing properties of dozens of specific herbs. There are herbs to support heart function, aid your mind and memory, strengthen and soothe your nervous system, activate your metabolism, support your bones and joints, and improve your ability to handle stress. You’ll learn how to choose the right herbs for your needs and how to prepare and use them safely and effectively, improving your vitality and wellbeing, whatever your age!

 

Visit our website to see all of our favorite books on Herbal Medicine.

books

Planting Herb Seeds in the Fall: A Visit to Horizon Herbs

Posted by On the Farm|10 November 2014

 

Horizon Herbs-Mountain Rose Herbs

 

The Mountain Rose Herbs’ procurement team pulled into a long driveway, following the handpainted signs of flowers pointing the way to park. We stepped out into the warm mid-morning air of Southern Oregon, smelling the smoky undertones of nearby wildfires. As our car doors opened, a flock of birds flushed out of a happy feeding frenzy; sparrows, juncos, and other small song birds were only mildly disturbed from the meal of seeds and small red berries. A wonderful herbal garden sat before us laden with their fruits of early fall.

We made our way down the driveway on foot and noticed small crops of plants scattered throughout an open area. Just ahead of us sat a large greenhouse and an outdoor shade cloth shelter harboring an incredible assortment of potted plants. Halfway up the drive, we were warmly greeted by the owner of this plant paradise carrying his sweet granddaughter in his arms.

 

Horizon Seeds Farm Visit

 

Richo Cech, along with his family, began Horizon Herbs back in 1985. After finding a passion for cultivating diverse medicinal plant seeds and understanding the increasing need for these seeds, Horizon Herbs was born, and the family began selling the products through their homemade catalogs.

Richo generously gave of his time, offering a small tour of his private herbal gardens where all the magic happens! We gained such appreciation for all the dedication, time, and commitment it takes to grow these plants so that they will bear fruit and the seeds can be saved to pass on to others.

The diversity of his offerings is nothing short of incredible, ranging from common medicinal weeds, like dandelion, to lesser known medicinal plants across the globe. Richo’s perspective on his trade is that “no plants are too common or too rare to benefit from cultivation–they are all medicine.”

 

Horizon Herbs-Mountain Rose Herbs

 

Providing medicinal seeds and live plants to the people not only connects folks to their own health, but also with nature. Every seed packet sold has specific instructions about how best to sow the seed, since every plant has different requirements. This connects the person to the cycle of that plant, as well as to the environment in which one lives. This creates happy growing conditions!

Patience and thinking outside the box are very important factors when trying to get certain seeds to grow. A common complaint from people who are trying to grow from seed is that the seeds don’t sprout. There are always a small percentage of seeds that are duds, however, more often than not, the seed is simply missing one small factor that encourages it to begin life. It could be giving it more time, or considering when it should be planted (seasonal), light and soil conditions, or the seed needs a specific action to mimic natural conditions such as storing in a cold, wet place for a certain amount of time. When truly stumped, Richo recommends looking to nature for the answer.

Learning about the life cycle and growing conditions of a certain plant will give you a wealth of information in understanding how that plant reproduces and when. Experimentation is a fun and excellent way to learn what your plant needs – a whole new world may open before your eyes.

 

Horizon Herbs-Seedlings-Mountain Rose Herbs

 

As we listen raptly to Richo’s stories and advice, we again notice the bird activity on the property. Richo smiles with the look and knowledge of one who has spent his life in nature and remarks, “The birds rejoice, that’s what it’s all about, we’re all connected.”

Horizon Herbs has just released their Fall/Winter catalog with the great tag line of “Plant it in the Fall!” We tend to think of planting season as being a springtime activity, however, many plants prefer (and it is part of their natural reproductive cycle) to be seeded in the ground this cool time of year. Many shrubs and perennials have an easier time being transplanted in autumn as their energy is naturally transferring to their root system, and this helps lesson the shock and gets them ready to grow come spring!

I always notice the abundance of seeds this time of year and realize that a large majority of our plants will drop their seeds now, and then begin to grow when life starts stirring in the spring. According to Horizon Herbs’ catalog, “…50% of temperate species germinate most reliably when planted using standard technique in a warm greenhouse or spring garden. But the remaining 50% do best sown outdoors or in the cold greenhouse in the fall or very early spring…”

A few examples of these fall sowed plants are Poppies, Shepherds Purse, Angelica, Black Cohosh, Borage, Comfrey, Stinging Nettle, and Passionflower.

You can find these and all the other seeds we offer from Horizon Herbs on our website. Please visit Horizon Herbs directly for an online catalog or to request one of their paper catalogs. For those of you itching to get your hands dirty but not sure where to start with medicinal plant gardening, I highly suggest Richo’s The Medicinal Herb Grower: A Guide for Cultivating Plants that Heal.

Mountain Rose Herbs is honored to support Horizon Herbs in “empowering gardeners to grow roots of sustainability.”

 

seeds

For more visits to the farm see: Sowing Seeds at Horizon Herbs

The Sunday Steep!

Posted by Kori|09 November 2014

The Sunday Steep - Weekly Tea Recipes

Elderberry syrup is delicious and oh-so-good-for-us, but what if you haven’t had time to make up a batch? Maybe you’ve just drizzled your last drizzle and are in need of some elderberry boost right now! There’s something a little decadent about this fruit and spice tea, but there’s also a lot of soothing deliciousness. Why not brew some up and snuggle in for a blustery day? (This recipe makes enough to share and can be made ahead and refrigerated too!)

Elderberry Spice Tea

1 Tablespoon dried organic Elderberries

1 teaspoon dried organic Wild Cherry Bark

1/2 teaspoon organic Whole Cloves

1 teaspoon organic dried Echinacea Roots (if needed)

1 teaspoon organic dried organic Orange or Lemon Peel

1-2 organic Cinnamon Sticks

Combine all the ingredients in a sauce pan and add 1 quart water. Heat to boil and then turn down and simmer for about 30 minutes. Strain berries and herbs, add honey to taste, and enjoy!

Rosemary Gladstar's Garden Wisdoms - Elderberry Medicine

Making Herbal Jam & Jelly!

Posted by Alieta|03 November 2014

 

Making Herbal Jelly and Jam!

 

I was really craving a “super fruit” jelly the other day, but with the bounty of summer long gone, I had to get creative. So, I set out to make some tasty spread with my favorite dried and powdered berries. The results were phenomenally delicious!

When making jams and jellies from dried berries or herbs, you generally want to use half as much as you would when using fresh herbs or berries. So, if a recipe calls for one cup of fresh lemon balm or elderberries, you will want to use 1/2 cup of dried instead. The reason for this is that dried herb will absorb liquid and expand, producing less herbal tea or berry juice base to turn into jam. While I made two “superfruit” jellies from dried berries, you could easily combine these ingredients with your favorite fresh berry jam recipe.  For example: Cherry Bilberry Jam or Blueberry Acai Jelly. Yum! I recently tried some of Peggy’s Blueberry Lavender jelly and that was a true treat.

An easy way to incorporate herbs into your jams is to make a strong tea in place of water or apple juice in a given recipe. If you want to make a Strawberry Holy Basil jam, you could follow a recipe for Strawberry jam, but replace any required water with a strong Holy Basil Tea! It’s that easy! Have fun with it!

A few berries to begin the jam journey…

Acai Berry Powder - These berries are delicate and start to ferment within 24 hours of harvest so they must immediately be turned into juice, wine, or be frozen or freeze dried (like the powder we offer). Acai berries contain antioxidants and anthocyanins, protein fiber, vitamin E and iron. They are naturally low in sugar and the flavor is a wonderful mixture of red wine and chocolate.

Goji Berries - These bright red, chewy berries have been used as a general nutrient tonic (Yin tonic) for many years and Chinese medicine refers to them as a “cooling tonic”. A member of the Solanaceae family, these fruits offer a complex flavor with layers of sweet, umami, bitter, sour, and salty.

Bilberry – Also known as the European blueberry, this fruit is a close relative of the blueberry, cranberry, and huckleberry, with a wonderful blue/purple color from natural anthocyanosides. Bilberries have a flavor very similar to blueberries and offer antioxidant bioflavonoids.

BarberryThis bright red berry has a wonderfully sweet/sour taste and contains citric acid, vitamin C, and the alkaloid berberine. Often used in Persian and Afghan cooking, or made into jam or pickles, barberries add a delicious little surprise to your unique herbal jam. 

Herbal Jelly Recipe

 

Acai & Goji Berry Jelly Recipe

yields 4 (4oz) jars

1/2 cup organic Acai Berry Powder

1/2 cup organic Lycii (Goji) Berries

1 1/2 cups water (or strong Herbal Tea of choice)

1/2 cup organic lemon juice

2 TBSP low sugar pectin

3/4 cup organic sugar

 

Bilberry & Barberry Jelly Recipe

yields 4 (4oz) jars

1/2 cup organic Bilberries

1/2 cup organic Barberries

1 1/2 cup water (or strong Herbal Tea of choice)

1/2 cup lemon juice

2 TBSP low sugar pectin

3/4 cup organic sugar

 

Directions

1. Place dried berries, water/tea, and lemon juice in a saucepan.  Smash the berries gradually as the water heats up and the berries begin to rehydrate.  Once the water comes to a boil, turn off and smash thoroughly for fifteen minutes.

2. Strain berry juice until you have about 1 1/2 cups liquid.  Let drip undisturbed for thirty minutes.

* This is a good time to get your sanitized jars warming up in a water bath, not boiling, just heating up.  Your lids should be heated as well, to a boil, and removed and dried just before using.

3. Pour juice into a stainless steel saucepan, add pectin and bring to boil Add sugar all at once and bring back to boil. Allow to boil hard for 1 minute stirring constantly.

4. Remove from heat and quickly skim off any foam that occurs at the top.

5. Pour juice into sanitized canning jars and wipe brim to make sure nothing is in the way of the seal. Remove lid from boiling water, dry, and screw on tight. Set aside.

6.  Once all of the jars are full of jelly, place in pre-heated water bath. Make sure water is covering jars by an inch at least. Boil hard for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude.

7. Remove and let sit undisturbed for 24 hours, check seal. After 24 hours, lid should not flex up and down, and if it does, keep it in the fridge for immediate use.

 

Superfruit Jelly Recipe!

 

Enjoy and feel free to share your recipes!

 

Free Herbal Webinar!

Posted by Erin|28 October 2014

Free Winter Wellness Webinar

 

Oooh, check this out! Our friends over at Learning Herbs are hosting a free webinar tomorrow night all about herbs for winter wellness. What a gift! You can sign up for free by clicking here!

 

New Video: Elderberries with Rosemary Gladstar

Posted by Erin|27 October 2014

VIDEO: Rosemary Gladstar's Garden Wisdoms - Elderberry Medicine

 

We had so much fun wandering through the garden with Rosemary Gladstar last summer!

A highlight of our day was when Rosemary spotted this towering elder swaying in the breeze. She shared lots of stories and passed down traditional knowledge about this important plant, as well as her favorite recipes using elderberries. (You can find organic elderberries in our shop by clicking here.) We hope you enjoy the video!

 

Looking for more elderberry recipes?

Berry Rooty Syrup

Fermented Elderberry Soda

Elderberry Oxymel

Even more elderberry recipes!

 

Rosemary Gladstar's Garden Wisdoms - Elderberry Medicine

 

33 Herbal Smoothie Boosts!

Posted by Alieta|14 October 2014

33 Herbal Boosts for your Super Smoothie

 

Here’s a question we’ve heard a lot from our Facebook and blog friends:

“What’s the deal with powdered herbs and how can I use them differently from cut and sifted herbs?”

There are a number of different ways you can use powders, but one really awesome thing about powdered herbs is that you can easily add a bit of herbal magic to your smoothies!

The herbs listed below are often called superherbs, superfruits, or super foods - although, we think all plants are pretty super! However you choose to define them, be sure to do your own research to see how they will best fit into your daily health regime.  It’s always a good idea, and fun, to diversify.  So, with that said, I’m excited to offer my master list to help you herb up your smoothie!

 

Here’s the master list of herbal boosts for your super smoothie!

33 Herbal Boosts for your Super Smoothie!

 

Acai Powder – Acai berry is relatively new to the US and has quickly become a popular fruit used in smoothies, sorbets, capsules, and juices. The dark purple Acai berry is a source of antioxidants and anthocyanins, and contains protein, fiber, vitamin E and iron. It is naturally low in sugar and the flavor is a mellow mixture of red wine and chocolate. This amazing fruit powder is certified organic and quickly freeze dried after harvest. 
 
Amla Powder – This is a dried and pulverized berry of a sacred tree in India known for being a source of vitamin C and having a sour, bitter, and astringent taste. The dehydrated Amla pieces will easily re-hydrate in water, creating a fibrous texture similar to dehydrated apples with a much tarter taste. You could also use the whole dried berries to make a juice as a base for your smoothies. This berry is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine practices and is considered a cooling pitta herb.

Barberries (juice base) – These dried, red Berberis berries are often used in Persian and Afghan cooking, or made into jam or pickles. Barberries are known for their citric acid content, vitamin content, and contain the active compound berberine. Super tasty berry power!

Bee Pollen – Bee pollen has a long and storied past throughout human history. Hippocrates and Pythagoras both prescribed bee pollen for its healing properties. Native Americans wore pouches containing pollen around their necks on long journeys to eat so they could sustain a high level of energy. Bee pollen has a complex flavor that’s sweet, spicy, and floral with hints of honey. 

Beet Root Powder – Beets have been used in folk medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments since the time of the Romans and was popularized by the French for its culinary value. The natural sugar content makes this powder a great sweetener! It also offers fiber, magnesium, potassium, zinc, beta-carotene, calcium, and B vitamins. 

Bilberries – A close relative of the blueberry, cranberry, and huckleberry, bilberries have a wonderful blue/purple color from natural anthocyanosides, which has earned them a rich medicinal history. Bilberries have a flavor very similar to blueberries and offer antioxidant bioflavonoids. 

Cacao Powder – Who doesn’t love the mood boosting properties of chocolate? The Mayan, Olmec, and Aztec civilizations used the entire cacao fruit medicinally. Cacao contains caffeine, flavonoids, phenylethylalamine, anandamide, magnesium, sulfur, oleic acid, theobromine, and tryptophan. Cacao beans and nibs are a source of magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese and potassium, and are a good source of vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C, E and pantothenic acid.

Camu Camu Powder This nutrient dense fruit from the Amazon rainforest is attracting the attention of many for its Vitamin C content. Camu camu has a highly acidic flavor that can be easily sweetened to taste. Use in your smoothie as a source of magnesium, potassium, Vitamin C, beta carotene, iron, and amino acids.
 
Carob Powder - Made popular as a caffiene-free substitute for chocolate, carob powder was once deemed essential to the opera for saving the voices of performance-weary sopranos. This pea family pod has been used as a food source for over 5,000 years, offering dense nutritional value and a naturally sweet and slightly bitter flavor.  
 
Cayenne Powder - The Capsicum family includes bell peppers, red peppers, and paprika, but the most famous medicinal members of the family are cayenne and chilies. Careful to use the slightest amount, unless you handle heat well! The capsaicin in these peppers has been used medicinally for its anti-inflammatory and diaphoretic properties. Try freezing our Lemon Tea in an ice cube tray and then blending them up with apple slices, fresh greens, fresh ginger, and a 1/8 tsp of Cayenne Powder.

Chaga Powder – Chaga is a parasitic carpophores mushroom that looks like the charred remains of burned wood on the side of a birch tree (sometimes growing on Elm and Alder, but Birch is its favorite). Chaga is commonly made into a tea, taken by tincture, or put into capsules for its antioxidant content. Why not give your smoothie some mushroom power?

Chia SeedsChia seeds rule! They are great for making homemade puddings, gel juice, or easy jam recipes. They also rule in smoothies. Chia was a staple for Incan, Mayan, and Aztec cultures. “Chia” is the Mayan word for “strength” and Chia seeds used to be referred to as “Warrior Running Food” because they are so energizing.

Chlorella PowderSome scientists believe these single celled algae may be among the Earth’s oldest living organisms. Natural health enthusiasts know chlorella well as an excellent source of nutrients. Its bright green color would make it a perfect pair for leafy greens like kale or dandelion. You can also use it instead of fresh greens in your winter smoothie recipes!

Cordyceps Powder Cordyceps is an adaptogen and has been used to create stimulating tonics and maintain a healthy functioning immune system in times of stress. Contains Adenine, adenosine, uracil, uridine, guanidine, guanosine, hypoxanthine, inosine, thymine, thymidine, and deoxyuridine.

Cranberry PowderA diuretic and wonderfully flavorful herb, its fruity tartness and beautiful color is perfect for your berry filled smoothies.  Conventional cranberry juice from the store often has lots of added sugar that can actually negate the benefits of this powerful fruit!

Damiana Leaf PowderHistorically used as an aphrodisiac, this is one of the best herbal mood boosters out there. Light floral taste with a spicy finish and lovely green color, damiana leaf powder would go great in a smoothie to help you deal with those day-to-day ups and downs we all experience.

Elderberry PowderElder flowers and berries have a long history in traditional European medicine. Elderberries are traditionally made into a syrup for ingestion during the fall and winter months. The berries have a gorgeous dark purple red color and a sweet and rich flavor. You can make a syrup with the berries to add to your smoothie or boil the powder in some water and add to your liquid base. 

33 Herbal Smoothie Boosts!

Flaxmeal Flax seed is an important and very popular ingredient found in the world of herbal health foods as a source of omega fatty acids and fiber. Add some to your smoothies or use the meal in bread and muffin recipes!

Garcinia Fruit – This dark red fruit can be rehydrated and blended up with your smoothie base. It is said to make recipes more filling and satisfying, which can be helpful to extend your morning shake! It has a distinct sour fruit flavor.

Guarana Seed PowderGuarana is thought to be the highest source of caffeine available in nature, containing 2.5 times the amount of caffeine as coffee. A lovely addition to your morning smoothie!

Hawthorn Berry PowderThe fruit of this rose family tree has been used traditionally to support a healthy functioning cardiovascular system. It offers antioxidant flavonoids!

Hemp SeedWith a lightly nutty flavor and healthy fats, hemp seeds make a great addition to any smoothie! Hemp seed contains all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids that our bodies need, which makes it a perfect protein supplement. No other single source provides such a complete protein in a form that is so easily digested and absorbed by the body

Hibiscus Flower Powder A beautiful flower with a tart taste due to its content of 15 to 30% plant acids, including citric, malic, and tartaric acids in a lovely wine-red color. Hibiscus is used as one of the main ingredients in many tea blends for its color and level of antioxidants.

Kava Root PowderA beloved herb and a trusted ally during times of trial. Kava tea made from powdered kava root is warming and soothing to the nerves, body, and soul. Pacific Islanders have for centuries used Kava to calm nerves and help with relaxation.

Lycii BerriesA great way to sweeten your smoothies is to soak a handful of these dehydrated berries in water or milk overnight. In the morning, toss the combination into your blender with fruit or veggies! Lycii berry, otherwise known to Chinese herbalists as Goji or Chinese Wolfberry is bright red and almost chewy with a taste very similar to raisins. It has been used as a general nutrient tonic (Yin tonic) for many years and Chinese medicine refers to it as a “cooling tonic”.

Maca Root PowderMaca is traditionally prepared as a food, particularly in South America where it grows. The root is a highly nutritious staple food, boasting carbohydrates, protein, and a variety of essential minerals like calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, sterols, and essential fatty acids. Because of it’s mineral content Maca has been used to rejuvenate tired systems.

Maqui Berry PowderThese berries taste tart like huckleberries and contain powerful antioxidant properties. It is documented that Macqui berries have been used by the Mapuche natives of Chile and Argentina for centuries. Maqui berries are relatively new to the American herbal market, and are primarily being sold as one of the latest “superfoods” with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and other beneficial attributes. 

Milk Thistle Seed Powder – Three of the active compounds within milk thistle seed are collectively identified as silymarin. This constituent is credited for much of milk thistle’s medicinal value, particularly associated with supporting healthy liver function.

Rosehips  The fruit of the rose is one of the most concentrated sources of Vitamin C. Rosehips have a tart flavor and are widely used in jams, jellies, and teas.

Spirulina Powder  The concentration of amino acids has made spirulina a popular nutritional supplement for those who are unable to obtain sufficient calories and protein through diet alone, particularly athletes who burn calories at a high rate. A slightly sweet earthy taste, this powder is great taken in capsule form or as an addition to your daily smoothie.

Wheat Grass Powder – Wheat grass sprouts contain a high level of organic phosphates and a potent cocktail of antioxidants. If you are unable to grow your own, a powder is an easy addition to your super smoothies!

Yacon Root PowderThis root is commonly made into a sweet syrup or extract. In powder form, yacon root makes an excellent addition to your blended beverage. It is thought to be one of the “lost crops” of the Incas, who were known to cultivate it and who considered it an important food crop. The fresh root is small and similar in appearance to a potato, and is said to taste similar to a cross between celery and Granny Smith apples.

33 Herbal Boosts for Your Super Smoothie!

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

Posted by Alieta|06 October 2014

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

 

Have you been searching for an alternative to alcohol-based tinctures? Looking for a way to extract the benefits of herbs and preserve them? Maybe you like your medicine a little on the sweet side?

Vegetable glycerine, the sweet principle of oils, was discovered in 1789 and came into use by medicine makers around 1846. This liquid is obtained by the hydrolysis of vegetable fats or fixed oils. The food grade vegetable glycerine offered by Mountain Rose Herbs is certified organic and kosher, making it a great option.

Sometimes referred to as glycerol, glycerine is a clear, colorless, and odorless liquid with an incredibly sweet taste having the consistency of thick syrup. Glycerine has been used as an ingredient in toothpaste, shampoos, soaps, herbal remedies, and other household items.

Glycerine is also a great solvent for extracting constituents from plants without the use of alcohol. These extracts are known as “glycerites” and are an excellent choice for administering herbal support to pets, children, or people who are sensitive to alcohol for any reason. Glycerine is slightly antiseptic and has anti-fermentative properties that are efficient for preservation. A glycerite has a shelf life of 14-24 months, versus an alcohol extract with a shelf life of 4-6 years.

When making a glycerite with dried herbs, it is common to use water to rehydrate the herbs and loosen up the botanical matter. Generally a mixture with 60% or more glycerin to 40% or less water is a safe ratio. To err on the side of safety, I go with a 75% glycerine to 25% water ratio. If you are working with fresh moist herb, you can go with 100% glycerine for your extract – just be sure to muddle well.

 

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

 

Directions for making your own alcohol-free herbal glycerites:
  1. Fill a mason jar ½ way with dried herb (2/3 way full with fresh herb). Chop dried herb well before mixing with menstruum.
  2. In a separate jar, mix 3 parts organic Vegetable Glycerine and 1 part distilled water. Shake to combine.
  3. Pour liquid mixture over the herb and completely cover to fill the jar.
  4. Label container with date, ratio of glycerine to water, and herbs used.
  5. Agitate daily for 4-6 weeks.
  6. Strain with cheesecloth, bottle, label!
  • Note: If you used a fine powder you may need to double filter, and even filter through a coffee filter to ensure that no botanical material remains in your glycerite.

 

Wondering which herbs to try first? Here’s a list of herbs recommended for glycerite preparation from herbalist James Green’s Herbal Medicine Maker’s Handbook

 

Burdock

Chamomile

Cleavers

Dandelion

Echinacea

Elder flowers

Fennel

Ginger

Goldenseal

Hawthorn

Mugwort

Mullein

Nettle

Oat Tops

Peppermint

Skullcap

Ginseng Root Powder

Uva Ursi

Vitex

Valerian

 

Enjoy your alcohol-free extract!

 

How to Make Herbal Glycerites

 

The Sunday Steep!

Posted by Kori|05 October 2014

How to make Rooty Decoction Teas

 

Preparing a simple decoction is one of my favorite ways to consume roots. While leaves and flowers lend themselves well to a quickly-brewed tea, the roots can take a little more planning. A decoction is a method of simmering roots, barks, berrries, etc. to extract their properties. It takes a little more effort, but it is well worth it – especially when you can enjoy a lovely combination like the following…

 

roasted-dandelion-root1

 

Digestion Root Tea

2 Tablespoons organic Burdock Root

2 Tablespoons organic Dandelion Root

2 Tablespoons organic Astragalus Root

1 Tablespoon organic Ginger Root

Combine all the herbs in a saucepan with 3-4 cups cold or tepid water. Bring to a boil for a few minutes before turning the heat down to low and letting the herbs simmer and steep in the hot water for another 5-10 minutes. At this point, you can either strain the herbs and drink the tea or you can let the herbs rest in the water for a longer time (even pouring into a jar, covering and letting sit overnight) for an even stronger decoction. Strain before drinking.

If you’d like to add some other herbs to this, I like nutritive herbs like Nettle, Oatstraw or Dandelion Leaf!

The Sunday Steep - Weekly Tea Recipes

 

 

Summer’s Bounty on the Farm

Posted by On the Farm|01 October 2014

 

“It is only the farmer who faithfully plants seeds in the Spring, who reaps a harvest in the Autumn.”

- BC Forbes

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

The seasons have once again turned and here we stand in “summer’s green” as Shakespeare so eloquently described the bounty of crops. Our Northwest farms are spending long and hot days harvesting, drying, and milling the herbs that will eventually become our delicious organic teas and herbal medicines.

I absolutely love visiting farms this time of year. The crops have reached the stage of harvest and stand full of life, beauty, and color in the fields. It is mesmerizing to look down the field rows neatly lined and extending to the horizon.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

The success and bounty of these crops lie in the hands of the farmers who tend them – care that begins even before the seed is planted. Growing medicinal plants is an entirely different game than vegetable growing and can take years of learning to get it just right.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

Herbs have very specific harvest times and can have multiple harvests throughout the year. For instance, many types of mints can be harvested up to three different times in one season. Roots on the other hand can only be harvested once and it generally happens closer to the fall.

Once the plant is harvested, it is a race against time to get them into drying facilities before degradation and fermentation sets in. I was recently told that Red Clover Blossoms, if left in a pile after harvesting, can start smoldering within minutes due to the weight of the material and fast fermentation. Not to mention the same blossoms can be one of the trickiest herbs to dry in order to keep the lovely purple color intact.

Below is a picture of our drying Angelica seed heads getting ready to be planted for next year’s harvest.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

Summer is nature’s time for action and plant people like us can’t help but be pulled into the energy of the season. Now that it’s fall, I have to remind myself to relax, make a glass of organic mint tea, sit in my autumn garden, and feel grateful for the summer’s bounty.

 

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Anna Bradley is our Domestic Farms Representative and is a member of our Green Team!  In her spare time she is an herbalist, a teacher of nature connection and primitive skills to children and adults, and a singer/songwriter.  Anna is a student of Columbine’s School of Botanical Studies and co-founder of Whole Earth Nature School.

 

Our New Catalog is Here!

Posted by Erin|24 September 2014

Free Catalog from Mountain Rose Herbs!

 

Our new catalog for Autumn 2014/Winter 2015 has arrived!

As cool weather draws us near the hearth, we’re crafting gifts for the holidays, baking treats, and making medicine from this year’s bounty. We’ve filled these pages with new recipes like vegan gluten-free White Chocolate Coconut Bark, Rosemary Mint Elixir, and Herb Roasted Chickpeas, as well as unique homemade gift ideas, herbal profiles, and new products.

As always, we print on post-consumer waste paper with eco-friendly inks so you can recycle the cover and compost the rest, although we hope you’ll keep it around for a bit or share it with a friend. You can also view the catalog online by clicking here!

Want a FREE copy all for yourself?

Request a new catalog here!

 

New Palo Santo Essential Oil!

Posted by Christine|19 September 2014

palo_santo_eoPalo Santo Essential Oil
Bursera graveolens

This almost colorless essential oil is steam distilled from the wood of the sacred Palo Santo tree. It has a tenacious, sweetly woody, citrus aroma with a sharp resinous back note that is both complex and uplifting.

Palo Santo is used in South America in much the same way as White Ceremonial Sage is used in North America – to combat negative energy and to cleanse the space. This uniquely aromatic oil is quickly gaining popularity in the aromatherapy and perfumery worlds. This grounding oil is prized for its spiritual applications, and adds a lovely rounding note to essential oil blends.

The Palo Santo essential oil offered by Mountain Rose Herbs is distilled from sustainably cultivated wood that comes from a 50 acre farm in Ecuador with both naturally occurring and replanted Palo Santo. They have replanted over 5000 Palo Santo trees on the land so far to ensure adequate supply for the future.

Learn more about the amazing oil HERE!

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  • ErinErin (363)
    Erin is the Marketing Director at Mountain Rose and studied herbalism, botany, and ethical wildcrafting at the Columbines School of Botanical Studies. She spends her days making botanical illustrations, playing in the garden, creating culinary gems, and formulating medicine in the magnificent Oregon Cascades.
    ChristineChristine (128)
    Christine is our Product Manager here at Mountain Rose Herbs and our Certified Aromatherapist on staff. She's a longtime Mountain Roser with nearly a decade under her belt and assists with selecting new and exciting herbal and herb-related products. She also makes sure our current products are the best they can be!
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    Irene Wolansky is the Customer Experience Director at Mountain Rose Herbs. Born and raised on the Oregon coast, her interests include crafting body care products and herbal medicine, harvesting mushrooms, gardening, brewing herbal mead, fermentation, and exploring wild areas.
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