33 Herbal Smoothie Boosts!

Posted by Alieta|14 October 2014

33 Herbal Boosts for your Super Smoothie

 

Here’s a question we’ve heard a lot from our Facebook and blog friends:

“What’s the deal with powdered herbs and how can I use them differently from cut and sifted herbs?”

There are a number of different ways you can use powders, but one really awesome thing about powdered herbs is that you can easily add a bit of herbal magic to your smoothies!

The herbs listed below are often called superherbs, superfruits, or super foods - although, we think all plants are pretty super! However you choose to define them, be sure to do your own research to see how they will best fit into your daily health regime.  It’s always a good idea, and fun, to diversify.  So, with that said, I’m excited to offer my master list to help you herb up your smoothie!

 

Here’s the master list of herbal boosts for your super smoothie!

33 Herbal Boosts for your Super Smoothie!

 

Acai Powder – Acai berry is relatively new to the US and has quickly become a popular fruit used in smoothies, sorbets, capsules, and juices. The dark purple Acai berry is a source of antioxidants and anthocyanins, and contains protein, fiber, vitamin E and iron. It is naturally low in sugar and the flavor is a mellow mixture of red wine and chocolate. This amazing fruit powder is certified organic and quickly freeze dried after harvest. 
 
Amla Powder – This is a dried and pulverized berry of a sacred tree in India known for being a source of vitamin C and having a sour, bitter, and astringent taste. The dehydrated Amla pieces will easily re-hydrate in water, creating a fibrous texture similar to dehydrated apples with a much tarter taste. You could also use the whole dried berries to make a juice as a base for your smoothies. This berry is commonly used in Ayurvedic medicine practices and is considered a cooling pitta herb.

Barberries (juice base) – These dried, red Berberis berries are often used in Persian and Afghan cooking, or made into jam or pickles. Barberries are known for their citric acid content, vitamin content, and contain the active compound berberine. Super tasty berry power!

Bee Pollen – Bee pollen has a long and storied past throughout human history. Hippocrates and Pythagoras both prescribed bee pollen for its healing properties. Native Americans wore pouches containing pollen around their necks on long journeys to eat so they could sustain a high level of energy. Bee pollen has a complex flavor that’s sweet, spicy, and floral with hints of honey. 

Beet Root Powder – Beets have been used in folk medicine to treat a wide variety of ailments since the time of the Romans and was popularized by the French for its culinary value. The natural sugar content makes this powder a great sweetener! It also offers fiber, magnesium, potassium, zinc, beta-carotene, calcium, and B vitamins. 

Bilberries – A close relative of the blueberry, cranberry, and huckleberry, bilberries have a wonderful blue/purple color from natural anthocyanosides, which has earned them a rich medicinal history. Bilberries have a flavor very similar to blueberries and offer antioxidant bioflavonoids. 

Cacao Powder – Who doesn’t love the mood boosting properties of chocolate? The Mayan, Olmec, and Aztec civilizations used the entire cacao fruit medicinally. Cacao contains caffeine, flavonoids, phenylethylalamine, anandamide, magnesium, sulfur, oleic acid, theobromine, and tryptophan. Cacao beans and nibs are a source of magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, copper, manganese and potassium, and are a good source of vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, C, E and pantothenic acid.

Camu Camu Powder This nutrient dense fruit from the Amazon rainforest is attracting the attention of many for its Vitamin C content. Camu camu has a highly acidic flavor that can be easily sweetened to taste. Use in your smoothie as a source of magnesium, potassium, Vitamin C, beta carotene, iron, and amino acids.
 
Carob Powder - Made popular as a caffiene-free substitute for chocolate, carob powder was once deemed essential to the opera for saving the voices of performance-weary sopranos. This pea family pod has been used as a food source for over 5,000 years, offering dense nutritional value and a naturally sweet and slightly bitter flavor.  
 
Cayenne Powder - The Capsicum family includes bell peppers, red peppers, and paprika, but the most famous medicinal members of the family are cayenne and chilies. Careful to use the slightest amount, unless you handle heat well! The capsaicin in these peppers has been used medicinally for its anti-inflammatory and diaphoretic properties. Try freezing our Lemon Tea in an ice cube tray and then blending them up with apple slices, fresh greens, fresh ginger, and a 1/8 tsp of Cayenne Powder.

Chaga Powder – Chaga is a parasitic carpophores mushroom that looks like the charred remains of burned wood on the side of a birch tree (sometimes growing on Elm and Alder, but Birch is its favorite). Chaga is commonly made into a tea, taken by tincture, or put into capsules for its antioxidant content. Why not give your smoothie some mushroom power?

Chia SeedsChia seeds rule! They are great for making homemade puddings, gel juice, or easy jam recipes. They also rule in smoothies. Chia was a staple for Incan, Mayan, and Aztec cultures. “Chia” is the Mayan word for “strength” and Chia seeds used to be referred to as “Warrior Running Food” because they are so energizing.

Chlorella PowderSome scientists believe these single celled algae may be among the Earth’s oldest living organisms. Natural health enthusiasts know chlorella well as an excellent source of nutrients. Its bright green color would make it a perfect pair for leafy greens like kale or dandelion. You can also use it instead of fresh greens in your winter smoothie recipes!

Cordyceps Powder Cordyceps is an adaptogen and has been used to create stimulating tonics and maintain a healthy functioning immune system in times of stress. Contains Adenine, adenosine, uracil, uridine, guanidine, guanosine, hypoxanthine, inosine, thymine, thymidine, and deoxyuridine.

Cranberry PowderA diuretic and wonderfully flavorful herb, its fruity tartness and beautiful color is perfect for your berry filled smoothies.  Conventional cranberry juice from the store often has lots of added sugar that can actually negate the benefits of this powerful fruit!

Damiana Leaf PowderHistorically used as an aphrodisiac, this is one of the best herbal mood boosters out there. Light floral taste with a spicy finish and lovely green color, damiana leaf powder would go great in a smoothie to help you deal with those day-to-day ups and downs we all experience.

Elderberry PowderElder flowers and berries have a long history in traditional European medicine. Elderberries are traditionally made into a syrup for ingestion during the fall and winter months. The berries have a gorgeous dark purple red color and a sweet and rich flavor. You can make a syrup with the berries to add to your smoothie or boil the powder in some water and add to your liquid base. 

33 Herbal Smoothie Boosts!

Flaxmeal Flax seed is an important and very popular ingredient found in the world of herbal health foods as a source of omega fatty acids and fiber. Add some to your smoothies or use the meal in bread and muffin recipes!

Garcinia Fruit – This dark red fruit can be rehydrated and blended up with your smoothie base. It is said to make recipes more filling and satisfying, which can be helpful to extend your morning shake! It has a distinct sour fruit flavor.

Guarana Seed PowderGuarana is thought to be the highest source of caffeine available in nature, containing 2.5 times the amount of caffeine as coffee. A lovely addition to your morning smoothie!

Hawthorn Berry PowderThe fruit of this rose family tree has been used traditionally to support a healthy functioning cardiovascular system. It offers antioxidant flavonoids!

Hemp SeedWith a lightly nutty flavor and healthy fats, hemp seeds make a great addition to any smoothie! Hemp seed contains all the essential amino acids and essential fatty acids that our bodies need, which makes it a perfect protein supplement. No other single source provides such a complete protein in a form that is so easily digested and absorbed by the body

Hibiscus Flower Powder A beautiful flower with a tart taste due to its content of 15 to 30% plant acids, including citric, malic, and tartaric acids in a lovely wine-red color. Hibiscus is used as one of the main ingredients in many tea blends for its color and level of antioxidants.

Kava Root PowderA beloved herb and a trusted ally during times of trial. Kava tea made from powdered kava root is warming and soothing to the nerves, body, and soul. Pacific Islanders have for centuries used Kava to calm nerves and help with relaxation.

Lycii BerriesA great way to sweeten your smoothies is to soak a handful of these dehydrated berries in water or milk overnight. In the morning, toss the combination into your blender with fruit or veggies! Lycii berry, otherwise known to Chinese herbalists as Goji or Chinese Wolfberry is bright red and almost chewy with a taste very similar to raisins. It has been used as a general nutrient tonic (Yin tonic) for many years and Chinese medicine refers to it as a “cooling tonic”.

Maca Root PowderMaca is traditionally prepared as a food, particularly in South America where it grows. The root is a highly nutritious staple food, boasting carbohydrates, protein, and a variety of essential minerals like calcium, potassium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, sterols, and essential fatty acids. Because of it’s mineral content Maca has been used to rejuvenate tired systems.

Maqui Berry PowderThese berries taste tart like huckleberries and contain powerful antioxidant properties. It is documented that Macqui berries have been used by the Mapuche natives of Chile and Argentina for centuries. Maqui berries are relatively new to the American herbal market, and are primarily being sold as one of the latest “superfoods” with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and other beneficial attributes. 

Milk Thistle Seed Powder – Three of the active compounds within milk thistle seed are collectively identified as silymarin. This constituent is credited for much of milk thistle’s medicinal value, particularly associated with supporting healthy liver function.

Rosehips  The fruit of the rose is one of the most concentrated sources of Vitamin C. Rosehips have a tart flavor and are widely used in jams, jellies, and teas.

Spirulina Powder  The concentration of amino acids has made spirulina a popular nutritional supplement for those who are unable to obtain sufficient calories and protein through diet alone, particularly athletes who burn calories at a high rate. A slightly sweet earthy taste, this powder is great taken in capsule form or as an addition to your daily smoothie.

Wheat Grass Powder – Wheat grass sprouts contain a high level of organic phosphates and a potent cocktail of antioxidants. If you are unable to grow your own, a powder is an easy addition to your super smoothies!

Yacon Root PowderThis root is commonly made into a sweet syrup or extract. In powder form, yacon root makes an excellent addition to your blended beverage. It is thought to be one of the “lost crops” of the Incas, who were known to cultivate it and who considered it an important food crop. The fresh root is small and similar in appearance to a potato, and is said to taste similar to a cross between celery and Granny Smith apples.

33 Herbal Boosts for Your Super Smoothie!

The Sunday Steep!

Posted by Kori|12 October 2014

Dream Tea by Mountain Rose Herbs

Dream Tea

While I love creating my own tea blends and recipes, there are some teas that seem perfect just the way the are! I tend to be drawn to calming herbs and I think one of the most delicious “after dinner” teas we offer is our certified organic Dream Tea. Damiana is a go-to herb for me throughout the ups and downs of daily life and it tucks beautifully into this blend of organic peppermint leaf, chamomile flowers, gotu kola, mugwort, rosemary leaf, rose petals and a pinch of stevia leaf.

Brew up a cup using 2-3 teaspoons of tea, feel free to add a little honey and/or lemon to taste, and enjoy…

The Sunday Steep - Weekly Tea Recipes

New Chamomile Bitters!

Posted by Christine|10 October 2014

chamomile_bittersThe great folks at Urban Moonshine have added a new formula to their line of Herbal Bitters

CHAMOMILE BITTERS

This super tasty formula has a higher ginger content than the original formula and is made without essential oils. It is available in three different sizes:

  • 1/2 oz. personal glass spray bottle for your on-the-go bitters.
  • 2 oz. glass dropper bottle for office or home use.
  • 8.4 oz. glass refill bottle for economical filling of your smaller size.

Each batch is made with botanical herbal bitter goodness: organic Dandelion root and leaf, organic Chamomile, organic Burdock root, organic Yellow Dock root, and organic Ginger root. Contains alcohol.

Find out more about the full line of Urban Moonshine Herbal Bitters on our website HERE!!

Photo Thursday!

Posted by Alieta|09 October 2014

Photo Thursday! Mountain Rose Herbs

 

Meet the man who keeps us safe!

Rick is our Safety Manager, and he’s full of knowledge regarding prevention and preparedness!  A few weeks ago, Rick, along with a handful of other staff, spent a majority of their day with the folks from Isler picking up trash and beautifying our section of the Amazon bike path. Isler, a certified public accounting and business advising company located here in Eugene,  is recognized for its community service and sustainability efforts. While we work with some of their CPAs in the office, we couldn’t have been more thrilled to share this sunny day outside with some of their staff!

 

Saving Our Pacific Rivers

Posted by Alieta|08 October 2014

Pacific Rivers Council - Mountain Rose Herbs Guest Blog

 

We have a new guest blog from the Pacific Rivers Council! Natalie Bennon is a former journalist and grant writer who now does communications and development for the Pacific Rivers Council. Natalie is also the founder and owner of Springtale Strategies. Mountain Rose Herbs is a longtime supporter of Pacific Rivers Council, a non-profit that shares our mission to protect and restore rivers, watersheds, and wildlife.

 

Pacific Rivers Council - Mountain Rose Herbs Guest Blog

 

The Pacific Rivers Council was founded in 1987 by two rafting guides who witnessed first-hand the degradation of Oregon’s rivers…

 

“It was a moral assault to be out there on the Rogue River or the Deschutes River and see scum, oil slicks, and trash floating down the river. And it turned the clients off,” said Bob Doppelt, one of Pacific Rivers’ two founders.

 

Pacific Rivers Council - Mountain Rose Herbs Guest Blog

 

Today, Pacific Rivers works throughout the Northwest including Northern California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. In Oregon, we are blessed with abundant natural resources. We have beautiful rivers, stunning mountains, and millions of acres of forests. Once upon a time, Oregon led the nation in logging and wood products. But those years are long past. Pacific Rivers is working to protect clean water, healthy rivers, and forests because when left intact, they provide numerous services to people and communities, including clean water and clean air.

 

Pacific Rivers Council - Mountain Rose Herbs Guest Blog

 

Pacific Rivers Council works to protect these resources on federal, state, and private forests lands. In federal forests, the biggest threat right now is proposed logging increases that would reverse many of the protections Americans fought so hard for during the so-called timber wars of the 1990s. These protections have kept the few areas that still have large trees intact, benefiting communities, clean water, our economy, and our high quality of life. To explain the importance of trees to rivers, Pacific Rivers recently produced a video that follows Charley Dewberry, a stream ecologist, and the high school students he works with, scuba diving creeks in the Northwest to count fish and monitor conditions.

 

 

In state and private forests, some of the issues are the same, but the game is different. These lands are governed by the Oregon Forest Practices Act, the least protective state forest law on the West Coast. Washington has stronger logging rules. California has stronger logging rules. Oregon falls short, allowing logging closer to streams, dirtying the water, logging on slopes that are too steep with more risk for landslides, lax rules on road building and decommissioning, and an array of toxic herbicides including atrazine, a popular weed poison that kills young salmon and is harmful to humans. Last year, Pacific Rivers produced a video helping educate Oregonians about this issue. The Oregonian has written about the state forest practices act, asking whether it is protective enough of water and rivers.

 


Forests to Faucets short (version(720)
from
North Fork Studios
on Vimeo.

 

As customers of Mountain Rose Herbs, we know you understand and value a healthy environment, and see the connections that a healthy environment has with a healthy and sustainable economy. If you want to support our efforts to protect clean water, healthy rivers, and a vibrant, healthy economy, please consider joining us today.

Learn more about Mountain Rose River Projects!

 

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

Posted by Alieta|06 October 2014

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

 

Have you been searching for an alternative to alcohol-based tinctures? Looking for a way to extract the benefits of herbs and preserve them? Maybe you like your medicine a little on the sweet side?

Vegetable glycerine, the sweet principle of oils, was discovered in 1789 and came into use by medicine makers around 1846. This liquid is obtained by the hydrolysis of vegetable fats or fixed oils. The food grade vegetable glycerine offered by Mountain Rose Herbs is certified organic and kosher, making it a great option.

Sometimes referred to as glycerol, glycerine is a clear, colorless, and odorless liquid with an incredibly sweet taste having the consistency of thick syrup. Glycerine has been used as an ingredient in toothpaste, shampoos, soaps, herbal remedies, and other household items.

Glycerine is also a great solvent for extracting constituents from plants without the use of alcohol. These extracts are known as “glycerites” and are an excellent choice for administering herbal support to pets, children, or people who are sensitive to alcohol for any reason. Glycerine is slightly antiseptic and has anti-fermentative properties that are efficient for preservation. A glycerite has a shelf life of 14-24 months, versus an alcohol extract with a shelf life of 4-6 years.

When making a glycerite with dried herbs, it is common to use water to rehydrate the herbs and loosen up the botanical matter. Generally a mixture with 60% or more glycerin to 40% or less water is a safe ratio. To err on the side of safety, I go with a 75% glycerine to 25% water ratio. If you are working with fresh moist herb, you can go with 100% glycerine for your extract – just be sure to muddle well.

 

How to Make Glycerine Extracts

 

Directions for making your own alcohol-free herbal glycerites:
  1. Fill a mason jar ½ way with dried herb (2/3 way full with fresh herb). Chop dried herb well before mixing with menstruum.
  2. In a separate jar, mix 3 parts organic Vegetable Glycerine and 1 part distilled water. Shake to combine.
  3. Pour liquid mixture over the herb and completely cover to fill the jar.
  4. Label container with date, ratio of glycerine to water, and herbs used.
  5. Agitate daily for 4-6 weeks.
  6. Strain with cheesecloth, bottle, label!
  • Note: If you used a fine powder you may need to double filter, and even filter through a coffee filter to ensure that no botanical material remains in your glycerite.

 

Wondering which herbs to try first? Here’s a list of herbs recommended for glycerite preparation from herbalist James Green’s Herbal Medicine Maker’s Handbook

 

Burdock

Chamomile

Cleavers

Dandelion

Echinacea

Elder flowers

Fennel

Ginger

Goldenseal

Hawthorn

Mugwort

Mullein

Nettle

Oat Tops

Peppermint

Skullcap

Ginseng Root Powder

Uva Ursi

Vitex

Valerian

 

Enjoy your alcohol-free extract!

 

How to Make Herbal Glycerites

 

The Sunday Steep!

Posted by Kori|05 October 2014

How to make Rooty Decoction Teas

 

Preparing a simple decoction is one of my favorite ways to consume roots. While leaves and flowers lend themselves well to a quickly-brewed tea, the roots can take a little more planning. A decoction is a method of simmering roots, barks, berrries, etc. to extract their properties. It takes a little more effort, but it is well worth it – especially when you can enjoy a lovely combination like the following…

 

roasted-dandelion-root1

 

Digestion Root Tea

2 Tablespoons organic Burdock Root

2 Tablespoons organic Dandelion Root

2 Tablespoons organic Astragalus Root

1 Tablespoon organic Ginger Root

Combine all the herbs in a saucepan with 3-4 cups cold or tepid water. Bring to a boil for a few minutes before turning the heat down to low and letting the herbs simmer and steep in the hot water for another 5-10 minutes. At this point, you can either strain the herbs and drink the tea or you can let the herbs rest in the water for a longer time (even pouring into a jar, covering and letting sit overnight) for an even stronger decoction. Strain before drinking.

If you’d like to add some other herbs to this, I like nutritive herbs like Nettle, Oatstraw or Dandelion Leaf!

The Sunday Steep - Weekly Tea Recipes

 

 

New Tulsi Delight Tea!

Posted by Christine|03 October 2014

Organic Tulsi Delight Tea!

 

We looked to all of the wonderful employees here at Mountain Rose Herbs to help us name our newest tea blend. With over 130 submissions, the perfect name was actually submitted by two different people!

Great minds think alike…

 

Tulsi Delight Tea!

 

Congratulations to Halsey in Customer Service and Peggy our Purchasing Manager for coming up with a great name for our favorite new tea.

This delightful blend is lightly caffeinated and filled with Ayurvedic inspiration. The Ayurvedic name for Holy Basil is Tulsi, meaning The Incomparable One. It is considered a hot herb with pungent bitter tastes. This infusion combines these flavors with cooling mint and hibiscus. The lightly astringent taste from the Dao Ren green tea and pungent ginger flavors combine wonderfully to touch all of your senses. It is uplifting and energetic!

Contains: organic Holy Basil Rama leaf, organic Dao Ren tea, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Lemongrass, organic Hibiscus flowers, and organic Ginger root.

Find out more by clicking here!

 

Photo Thursday!

Posted by Erin|02 October 2014

Drink Organic Tea!

 

This week was so much fun!

We got to have a tea party photo shoot with one of our favorite little herbalists. Big thanks to Amelia (and her dad Mason) for sipping some organic Hibiscus High with us.

More cuteness from this shoot coming soon…

 

Summer’s Bounty on the Farm

Posted by On the Farm|01 October 2014

 

“It is only the farmer who faithfully plants seeds in the Spring, who reaps a harvest in the Autumn.”

- BC Forbes

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

The seasons have once again turned and here we stand in “summer’s green” as Shakespeare so eloquently described the bounty of crops. Our Northwest farms are spending long and hot days harvesting, drying, and milling the herbs that will eventually become our delicious organic teas and herbal medicines.

I absolutely love visiting farms this time of year. The crops have reached the stage of harvest and stand full of life, beauty, and color in the fields. It is mesmerizing to look down the field rows neatly lined and extending to the horizon.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

The success and bounty of these crops lie in the hands of the farmers who tend them – care that begins even before the seed is planted. Growing medicinal plants is an entirely different game than vegetable growing and can take years of learning to get it just right.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

Herbs have very specific harvest times and can have multiple harvests throughout the year. For instance, many types of mints can be harvested up to three different times in one season. Roots on the other hand can only be harvested once and it generally happens closer to the fall.

Once the plant is harvested, it is a race against time to get them into drying facilities before degradation and fermentation sets in. I was recently told that Red Clover Blossoms, if left in a pile after harvesting, can start smoldering within minutes due to the weight of the material and fast fermentation. Not to mention the same blossoms can be one of the trickiest herbs to dry in order to keep the lovely purple color intact.

Below is a picture of our drying Angelica seed heads getting ready to be planted for next year’s harvest.

 

Mountain Rose Herbs - Farm Stories

 

Summer is nature’s time for action and plant people like us can’t help but be pulled into the energy of the season. Now that it’s fall, I have to remind myself to relax, make a glass of organic mint tea, sit in my autumn garden, and feel grateful for the summer’s bounty.

 

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Anna Bradley is our Domestic Farms Representative and is a member of our Green Team!  In her spare time she is an herbalist, a teacher of nature connection and primitive skills to children and adults, and a singer/songwriter.  Anna is a student of Columbine’s School of Botanical Studies and co-founder of Whole Earth Nature School.

 

Gluten-Free Pizza Party Recipes!

Posted by Alieta|29 September 2014

Gluten Free Pizza Party Recipes!

 

It’s time for a pizza party…

I have been gluten-free for just about a year now.  The thing I miss most?  Pizza!  I used to love bringing home dough from my local co-op and rolling it out with my nieces and nephews for a personal pizza party.  Once I had to give up the gluten, I wasn’t exactly motivated to figure out how to make a gluten-free dough that would satisfy my pizza urges.  In the past year, I have only had pizza a handful of times, and it was rather expensive when I did – so I set out to finally make some gluten-free pizza bread myself!

This dough is not your normal dough. It’s a twist on a regular gluten-free pizza dough recipe and is easily enjoyed, even by our gluten-loving friends.  The mesquite powder (find it here) and teff flour combine to make a subtle sweetness with a soft and chewy texture. Mesquite powder is made from a legume that has long been a staple food of indigenous cultures in the Americas, making it a great wheat-free option for baking. This dough can easily hold up to toppings and is tasty on its own.

It wasn’t an easy task to find a gluten-free flour blend I could stand behind. The recipe below is one I’m very happy with and should work fine as a replacement in your other baking recipes, just add a tsp or two of organic psyllium husk powder or organic guar gum per cup of the Gluten-Free Flour Base.

 

Gluten-Free Flour Base
  • 4 1/2 cups + 1/3 cup organic white rice flour
  • 1 2/3 cups organic brown rice flour
  • 1 1/3 cups organic potato starch
  • 3/4 cup organic Arrowroot Powder
  • 1/4 cup organic teff flour

This should be enough flour blend to make 2 (almost 3) of the recipe below.

 

Mesquite Pizza Dough Recipe
  1. Using a stick or paddle blender, combine flour mix, mesquite powder, almond flour, psyllium husk powder, baking soda, salt, and yeast. Add in (while mixer is running on low if possible) warm water and oil. Turn to medium speed and mix for about 6 minutes or until everything is well combined and mixture resembles a thick batter.
  2. Remove bowl from mixer (remove lid if necessary) and cover with plastic wrap, let sit for about an hour and a half.
  3. Prepare baking sheet with parchment paper/oil. Using a spatula with olive oil, or hands and olive oil, spread dough out to roughly 11 to 12 inch wide circle, leaving a thicker crust at the edge.  If’ it’s easier, you can place a piece of plastic wrap on top of dough to help smooth it out.
  4. Place prepped crusts on middle or lower racks and cook for 45-50 minutes at 325 degrees. Cool.
  5. Top and bake for 10-12 minutes on middle or top rack at 500 degrees. Slice and enjoy!

 

Gluten Free Pizza Party Recipes!

 

Vegan Cashew Cheese

Ohhhh for the love of cheese!  How I miss cheese!  I discovered this delicious cashew “cheese” alternative while dining out for pizza one evening. It is SO easy to make!

Soak nuts in water overnight, rinse thoroughly, and strain.  Place in food processor with 3 cloves of garlic,  salt, and olive oil. Blend on high for about 3 minutes or until super smooth and chunk free! Add more oil if you would like, and spices if you so desire!

 

Herb Spiced Pizza Sauce

When I made this pizza recipe, tomatoes were pouring out of everyone’s ears here in Oregon. If they are not in season in your area, don’t feel bad about grabbing a can of organic tomatoes.

Dice tomatoes and place in deep cast iron skillet. Add water, olive oil, and spices.  Cook on medium to medium low for one to two hours. Use mashers to break down tomatoes.  After most of the water has dissolved, turn off and let cool.  Place in blender (if you desire) and blend up to a smooth consistency.  I sometimes like to leave it chunky too!  It’s up to you!

 

Spicy Pizza Sprinkle

Mix ingredients together and place in a shaker container to sprinkle on top of your pizza!

 

Gluten Free Pizza Party Recipes!

 

 

Enjoy the party!

 

The Sunday Steep!

Posted by Kori|28 September 2014

Firefly-ChaiPhoto

 

The rains are back! At least, here in Oregon, our beloved fall is kicking off with some delightful cloudbursts and puddles for tromping through! Rainy days call for tasty, savory, deeply-flavored tea, and the inspiration for this recipe is taken right from the sky!

 

Rainy Day Chai

2 Tablespoons organic Firefly Chai tea

1 teaspoon organic Nettle leaf

1 teaspoon organic roasted Cocao Nibs

1 dropper (or more, to taste) organic Lemon Balm extract/tincture

Combine the Firefly Chai, Nettle, and Cocao Nibs in a tea infuser, strainer or bag. Pour 2 – 2 1/2 cups boiling water over and let steep for 3-5 minutes. Add 1 dropper of Lemon Balm extract or tincture and stir to combine. Feel free to add a little milk, soy, and/or honey to taste. Enjoy!

nettleinfuse

 

 

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Meet Us

  • ErinErin (362)
    Erin is the Marketing Director at Mountain Rose and studied herbalism, botany, and ethical wildcrafting at the Columbines School of Botanical Studies. She spends her days making botanical illustrations, playing in the garden, creating culinary gems, and formulating medicine in the magnificent Oregon Cascades.
    ChristineChristine (137)
    Christine is our Product Manager here at Mountain Rose Herbs and our Certified Aromatherapist on staff. She's a longtime Mountain Roser with nearly a decade under her belt and assists with selecting new and exciting herbal and herb-related products. She also makes sure our current products are the best they can be!
    KoriKori (69)
    Kori is our Public and Media Relations Coordinator! A West Coast native, Kori is a seasoned nonprofit activist and community organizer. Having launched six adult kids, she spends her free time in her burgeoning organic and very urban “farm”—taming Heritage chickens, building top-bar beehives from reclaimed materials, baking, brewing, and preserving.
    IreneIrene (53)
    Irene Wolansky is the Customer Experience Director at Mountain Rose Herbs. Born and raised on the Oregon coast, her interests include crafting body care products and herbal medicine, harvesting mushrooms, gardening, brewing herbal mead, fermentation, and exploring wild areas.
    AlietaAlieta (42)
    Alieta is our Marketing Assistant! An Oregon native, she studied philosophy, Spanish and graphic design at Portland State University and has a natural affinity for the natural foods industry. She spends her time outside of work playing her 54 key Rhodes piano, hanging out with her cat Penelope, and cooking delicious gluten-free and dairy-free meals to share with friends.
    FriendsFriends (37)
    An array of voices from around Mountain Rose Herbs and beyond share their wisdoms, inspirations, and exciting stories from the herbal world.
    AlyssaAlyssa (27)
    Alyssa is the Director of Sustainability at Mountain Rose Herbs and an expert social butterfly. When not fluttering between community and non-profit events, she enjoys hiking, gardening, playing with her chickens, and organizing potlucks.
    On the FarmOn the Farm (17)
    Our team of farm representatives travel around the US and the world to visit our organic crops. They bring back stories and photos from their meetings with our farmers and important news about our herbal harvests.
    ShawnShawn (14)
    Shawn is the Vice President at Mountain Rose Herbs, which means he has his hands in just about everything here, but he is most passionate about advancing the company's ecological platforms for sustainable business practices. In his spare time, he can be found deep in Oregon’s designated wilderness areas or fly fishing (strictly catch and release) with his furry friends Abigail and Maggie.
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